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art tutorial 
22nd-Feb-2006 01:32 am
Owl totem
Ok. I promised a full on tutorial using my latest copic marker piece, so here it is -

loads of pics! dialup beware!!

Great BIG Tutorial... Collapse )
Comments 
21st-Feb-2006 10:58 am (UTC)
Anonymous
How did you get the freckles not to bleed?
I've never sucessfully created freckles.

The bright red leaves worked so well as you needed them too! What a great idea to deal with the heads!

And I can't believe the rock salt worked for you 0.o Rock salt has never worked for me. I have som ein a little tin and they stay there because they do nothing, no matter what pigmant and what brand of watercolors I use ^^

This was really nice! Thinks for taking the time to do this!
21st-Feb-2006 10:58 am (UTC)
And this .was me, ani_bester un logged in ^^ Sorry.
21st-Feb-2006 11:41 am (UTC)
Wow, this is so gorgeous and so, so interesting to see!! Thanks for taking the time to show us everything. :D
24th-Feb-2006 03:05 pm (UTC)
No problem! I'm glad you enjoyed it. :~)
21st-Feb-2006 12:38 pm (UTC)
Wow! It's so great to see the step by step process you go through. What hard work into it. I love seeing all the specifics and how the drawing comes alive after each step.

Wonderful job!
24th-Feb-2006 10:06 pm (UTC)
Thanks, pili! Glad you enjoyed seeing the step by step process. :~)
21st-Feb-2006 12:39 pm (UTC)
My mother was a wonderful water-colorist. She specialized in wild and colorful nature scenes. I'll never forget how she managed to get such incredible results with water depicted using rock salt and gin splashed across the waves and waterfalls. That was 40 years ago. That you can use some of these techniques with your far more realistic style thrills me. Thanks for doing this tutorial.
21st-Feb-2006 08:59 pm (UTC)
Gin?! That is SO hysterical! Artists are hysterical! Who would have thought to throw gin on watercolour? I must try that now!! It might even have an interesting effect on Copics because it's alcohol!! LOL!

Thanks for commenting and I'm so glad you enjoyed the tutorial! :~D
21st-Feb-2006 02:03 pm (UTC)
Wonderful, wonderful! Thank you for the tutorial.
24th-Feb-2006 10:16 pm (UTC)
Glad you enjoyed it; hope it was helpful. :~)
21st-Feb-2006 03:04 pm (UTC)
Anonymous
bjtruong has been back since December 21, 2005! Say 'hi' to him!
21st-Feb-2006 05:22 pm (UTC)
This is just outstanding, honey.

I really, really loved reading and watching the progression through this. I'd love to see the pictures in a little slide show so I can see how they change through the process.

Also, how long did this piece take you? And how typical is that amount of time?

21st-Feb-2006 09:18 pm (UTC)
There's a slide show of one of my older pics (Dumbldore's Army) on my website-
http://www.maythemusebewithyou.com/websalbum.htm
That's a digital pic rather than a marker pic, but it's fun to watch nonetheless. ;~)

As for how long this took me... far too long! I think I started the sketches in October!! *feels bad* Too many distractions in my house. :~( But, once I sat down and started painting... about a week? If you put the time I worked on it end to end, cutting out the family stuff, 4-5 days? I like to aim for a two week turnover but, as I said, family... The bloody kids expect to be fed every night! Bit of a gall really... ;~P
21st-Feb-2006 05:40 pm (UTC)
Thanks for sharing this, very interesting.

24th-Feb-2006 10:04 pm (UTC)
Glad you enjoyed it! :~)
21st-Feb-2006 06:09 pm (UTC)
Interesting tutorial! :)
24th-Feb-2006 10:16 pm (UTC)
Hope you found it helpful! :~)
21st-Feb-2006 06:27 pm (UTC)
How brilliant! You are amazing! I hope you don't mind if I put this in Fringeart's memories under Tutorials.
21st-Feb-2006 07:30 pm (UTC)
I don't mind at all! I'd be honoured! :~D Glad you enjoyed it too!
21st-Feb-2006 07:16 pm (UTC)
EEE! I am so blown away by this piece! Totally gorgeous, and watching it come to life is awesome! :D
24th-Feb-2006 02:45 pm (UTC)
Thankyou! I'm so glad you enjoyed the step by step process. :~)
22nd-Feb-2006 12:41 am (UTC)
This is totally bril; now I just need to learn to draw!
24th-Feb-2006 10:17 pm (UTC)
Heh. Glad you enjoyed it. :~)
22nd-Feb-2006 01:06 am (UTC)
Wow! I love it. Thank you so much for explaining your drawing process. I love to work with watercolors. glockgal had to tell me about light boxes, I didn't get the idea myself. ^^;
Next week I'll probably get a light box and then I'll remember this tutorial and will try to learn to do it right. *excited*

Thank you very much!
24th-Feb-2006 02:44 pm (UTC)
So glad you enjoyed it and found it helpful! :~)
22nd-Feb-2006 03:12 am (UTC)
Gah! Kate I took the plunge and bought some copics and Trias last week, so this tutorial has been a godsend! Thanks so much for sharing! My questions-
1. The process of Hermione and Rons hands and faces, what colour did you use for the fine lines (like outlines of fingers and noses etc) and was it a tria with the fine tip?
2. The leaves. You managed to overlay red leaves on an already dark tree trunk- was that acrylic?
3. When you put shadow on faces, is that more of a brown, and then to shadow clothes it more a blue/grey? Im really bad at shadowing with the correct colours! I know theres art 'rules' about this- do you know what they are?

Thankyou my helpful tutor!

4. Colurless blender hey. Im goin' for it!
22nd-Feb-2006 04:54 am (UTC)
Hi Sarah! Hope you're settling in down here. ;~) Did you go to Eckersleys for the markers? I need to go in again for more refills... O.o

1. The process of Hermione and Rons hands and faces, what colour did you use for the fine lines (like outlines of fingers and noses etc) and was it a tria with the fine tip?

Those lines are something I build up slowly, starting with the basic (light) pencil lines. I have 2 Tria/Pantone markers I use for working in those lines - 465 and 4655-T (which is slightly pinker than 465). I also have 2 fine-line "Zig Mellennium" pens that I use for those fine definitions. One is brown and one is blue. The two together make a nice black that isn't quite black and therefore not as harsh as a black line would be. If you look at the closeups you can see where I've used them on their eyes. :~)

2. The leaves. You managed to overlay red leaves on an already dark tree trunk- was that acrylic?
I used a Copic marker (Y38-Honey) to do all the leaves, then went over them with a roughly mixed red and orange gouache, then again with layers of yellow gouache. Gouache is opaque, of course, which is why it covers the tree. The markers go over gouach really nicely and I then did just that with the Honey colour, brightening the leaves again. Then I painted in more pale yellow gouache. :~)

3. When you put shadow on faces, is that more of a brown, and then to shadow clothes it more a blue/grey? Im really bad at shadowing with the correct colours! I know theres art 'rules' about this- do you know what they are?
The basic rule is - blue tones will make things receed, yellow tones will bring them forward.
The shadowing on faces and clothes really depends on the lighting etc., but I do try to have the same colours in both. Pale Lavender is one of my favourite colours to use in shadows; it really gives the faces depth. :~)


22nd-Feb-2006 05:36 am (UTC)
This is an amazing tutorial. I never knew you could use rock salt on water colour.

lol I am actually wondering if you could explain how to use the copic blender. I have Pentone markers (couldn't afford copic) and I bought a blender. But I can't seem to make is blend smoothly. The blender ink itself always leaves a definite edge on the colours I am trying to blend. I am wondering if there is a special technique to using the blender marker.
22nd-Feb-2006 06:13 am (UTC)
Do you mean Pantone markers? The ones with three nibs? Cos those are more expensive than Copics here in Australia.

The colourless blender works on marker ink like water does on watercolour. So if you have an area of flat colour, for example, and pressed your colourless blender tip in the middle of it, it would push the ink away from the nib in an ever widening radius, depending how long you left it pressed against the paper for. When you stop, and the colourless ink dries, you'd be left with a rough edged circle in the middle of the area of flat colour. If you repeated the proceedure right next to the first circle, the bleeding would overlap the first, and there would be a subsequent line as it dried. Just like you'd get with watercolours when you drip water on them.

With watercolours, the way to avoid those edges is to keep your paper wet; same applies for markers, but using blender fluid instead of water.

The way I use it on a face is by drawing in all the colours I want on the face - shadows and all - not worrying too much about the roughness of lines, then re-wetting or colouring the whole area with the colourless blender. All the tones then bleed into one another, creating a smooth transition. Do you follow? You then have to go back over the features with your other pens or pencils (depending what you're using), to add in defining lines etc.



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